A Very Honorable Guy (1934)

A VERY HONORABLE GUY (1934)
Article 4218 by Dave Sindelar
Date: 5-3-2013
Directed by Lloyd Bacon
Featuring Joe E. Brown, Alice White, Robert Barrat
Country: USA
What it is: Runyonesque comedy

Due to a run of bad luck, a well-intentioned but unlucky man of integrity loses everything and finds himself owing a debt to a loan shark that he won’t be able to pay. He decides to sell his body to science with the hope that the money will help him pay off his debts and allow his last month on Earth to be comfortable. Then he suddenly becomes lucky…

This is a fairly amusing comedy based on a Damon Runyon story and is filled with the type of characters and ambiance that you would expect from a Damon Runyon story. If there’s any one thing I really got out of this one, it was that Joe E. Brown was actually a very good actor. Yes, he was playing a certain stock character most of the time, and he was always a bit upstaged by that memorable face of his, but he did tap into the feel of the movies he did and made sure his character fit into the general mood of the picture; here, for example, he comes across as quite Runyonesque, which wasn’t the case in the other movies I’ve seen of his. Overall, I was quite entertained by this one, though there are times where the plot contrivances are a little too forced.

However, there is a secondary issue here as far as the fantastic content goes. The Don Willis guide mentions a plot element about a scientist experimenting with rejuvenation, which would qualify the movie by making it at least marginally a piece of science fiction. The Walt Lee guide consigns it to the Exclusions list; it lists the same fantastic content, but places a question mark after it. In this case, the Walt Lee guide had the correct instincts. There is one doctor in the story (the one who purchases Joe E. Brown’s body), but he never mentions anything about experiments with rejuvenation, and only seems interested in Brown because of the shape of his head. The closest the movie comes as far as any fantastic content goes is that one of the characters is revealed to be quite mad, and since this is demonstrated in a comic rather than horrific way, it’s really too marginal to consider. Therefore, this is another of the false alarms, and really doesn’t qualify.

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