Seven Keys to Baldpate (1935)

SEVEN KEYS TO BALDPATE (1935)
Article 2152 by Dave Sindelar
Viewing Date: 2-5-2007
Posting Date: 7-4-2007
Directed by William Hamilton and Edward Killy
Featuring Gene Raymond, Margaret Callahan, Eric Blore

A writer moves into Baldpate Inn to write a novel under the belief he has the only key to the establishment. However, when several other people show up (including gangsters, women and a professor), he realizes that there are several keys. He then gets embroiled in a struggle over a big wad of money.

I suppose I could complain about how many versions of this story are out there, but this is only the second one I’ve seen; compare than to “Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde”, of which I’ve seen at least nine versions to date. Also, since the story is only marginally fantastic (in this one, a decidedly non-ectoplasmic hermit is the “ghost” haunting the house, and he does precious little of that), most reference books omit them. I’ve already seen the 1929 version, and even though I don’t remember it very well, I get the impression that this version makes a number of changes to the story. Its play version by George M. Cohan must have been phenomenally successful to have this many versions of it made, but I suspect that its magic doesn’t quite translate to the screen; it’s only mildly funny at best, and the fact that the wise-guy writer refuses to be frightened by anything somewhat short-circuits its ability to build much in the way of suspense. Ultimately, it’s a somewhat confusing rehash of “old dark house” mystery elements. Still, the movie is enlivened by some fun performances including Henry Travers as the misogynistic ghost/hermit and a cameo by Walter Brennan as a station agent. It’s only a matter of time before the other versions show up in this series as well.

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s